Mhairi worked closely with 25 women who have overcome child loss, domestic abuse, rape, self-harm, body dysmorphia, suicide attempts, breast cancer and much more.

A book has been published to accompany the project and will be available to buy for £5 throughout the duration of the exhibition.

 

She hopes the exhibition will help others relating to these issues to take comfort in knowing they are not alone, and perhaps have the strength to find their own voice too.

Their stories are heart rendering but they have all found courage to sit in front of Mhairi’s camera to have their portraits taken. Each portrait has been composed against a simple background, their stories unfold when you read the accompanying text.

Madeline, who features in one of the portraits decided to speak out about the horrific abuse she lived through and how she overcame fear and anxiety to become a mother, which was a big turning point in her life.

“I had thought it was going to be like being raped again,” she says. “I think when I reversed my decision and decided that I would become a mum, that’s when I came up with my plan that I call my best revenge.

“I decided I didn’t want these two men to have that power over me. I thought if I never became a mum, they have won”.

“I just refused to be identified by what had happened to me and I was very persistent in healing”.

The exhibition shows empowerment and persistence through personal stories overcoming adversity. It’s a testament to the role of the photographer and the role photography can play in finding hope.

STV,TV have published a full interview with Mhairi including more information about the women behind this exhibition, read it here.

 

The exhibition has been made possible with the following sponsors.